SONS Automotive Group Compares 2019 BMW X5 VS 2019 GMC Yukon Near Buford, GA

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2019 BMW X5

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2019 BMW X5

VS
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2019 GMC Yukon

Safety Comparison

The X5’s pre-crash front seatbelts will tighten automatically in the event the vehicle detects an impending crash, improving protection against injury significantly. The Yukon doesn’t offer pre-crash pretensioners.

The X5 has standard Active Protection, which automatically apply the brakes in the event of a crash to help prevent secondary collisions and prevent further injuries. The Yukon doesn’t offer a post collision braking system: in the event of a collision that triggers the airbags, more collisions are possible without the protection of airbags that may have already deployed.

To provide maximum traction and stability on all roads, All-Wheel Drive is standard on the X5. But it costs extra on the Yukon.

When descending a steep, off-road slope, the X5’s standard Hill Descent Control allows you to creep down safely. The Yukon doesn’t offer Hill Descent Control.

A passive infrared night vision system optional on the X5 helps the driver to more easily detect people, animals or other objects in front of the vehicle at night. Using an infrared camera to detect heat, the system then displays the image on a monitor in the dashboard. The Yukon doesn’t offer a night vision system.

The X5 offers an optional Surround View to allow the driver to see objects all around the vehicle on a screen. The Yukon only offers a rear monitor and front and rear parking sensors that beep or flash a light. That doesn’t help with obstacles to the sides.

The X5’s driver alert monitor detects an inattentive driver then sounds a warning and suggests a break. According to the NHTSA, drivers who fall asleep cause about 100,000 crashes and 1500 deaths a year. The Yukon doesn’t offer a driver alert monitor.

For better protection of the passenger compartment, the X5 uses safety cell construction with a three-dimensional high-strength frame that surrounds the passenger compartment. It provides extra impact protection and a sturdy mounting location for door hardware and side impact beams. The Yukon uses a body-on-frame design, which has no frame members above the floor of the vehicle.

Both the X5 and the Yukon have standard driver and passenger frontal airbags, side-impact head airbags, front seatbelt pretensioners, four-wheel antilock brakes, traction control, electronic stability systems to prevent skidding, daytime running lights and rearview cameras.

Warranty Comparison

The X5 comes with a full 4-year/50,000-mile basic warranty, which covers the entire truck and includes 24-hour roadside assistance. The Yukon’s 3-year/36,000-mile basic warranty expires 1 year and 14,000 miles sooner.

The X5’s corrosion warranty is 6 years and unlimited miles longer than the Yukon’s (12/unlimited vs. 6/100,000).

BMW pays for scheduled maintenance on the X5 for 1 year and 12000 miles longer than GMC pays for maintenance for the Yukon (3/36,000 vs. 2/24,000).

Reliability Comparison

For smoother operation, better efficiency and fewer moving parts, the engines in the X5 have an overhead cam design, rather than the old pushrod design of the engines in the Yukon.

J.D. Power and Associates’ 2018 Initial Quality Study of new car owners surveyed provide the statistics that show that BMW vehicles are better in initial quality than GMC vehicles. J.D. Power ranks BMW 11th in initial quality, above the industry average. With 12 more problems per 100 vehicles, GMC is ranked 20th, below the industry average.

J.D. Power and Associates’ 2018 survey of the owners of three-year-old vehicles provides the long-term dependability statistics that show that BMW vehicles are more reliable than GMC vehicles. J.D. Power ranks BMW 8th in reliability, above the industry average. With 29 more problems per 100 vehicles, GMC is ranked 18th.

From surveys of all its subscribers, Consumer Reports’ April 2018 Auto Issue reports that BMW vehicles are more reliable than GMC vehicles. Consumer Reports ranks BMW 21 places higher in reliability than GMC.

Engine Comparison

The X5 xDrive50i’s standard 4.4 turbo V8 produces 36 more horsepower (456 vs. 420) and 19 lbs.-ft. more torque (479 vs. 460) than the Yukon Graphite Performance Edition/Denali’s standard 6.2 V8.

Fuel Economy and Range Comparison

On the EPA test cycle the X5 gets better fuel mileage than the Yukon:

 

 

X5

Yukon

 

2WD

 

n/a

15 city/22 hwy

5.3 V8/Auto

 

 

n/a

14 city/23 hwy

6.2 V8/Auto

4WD

xDrive40i/Auto

20 city/26 hwy

15 city/21 hwy

5.3 V8/Auto

 

xDrive50i/Auto

17 city/22 hwy

14 city/22 hwy

6.2 V8/Auto

Regenerative brakes improve the X5’s fuel efficiency by converting inertia back into energy instead of wasting it. The Yukon doesn’t offer a regenerative braking system.

In heavy traffic or at stoplights the X5’s engine automatically turns off when the vehicle is stopped, saving fuel and reducing pollution. The engine is automatically restarted when the driver gets ready to move again. (Start/Stop isn’t accounted in present EPA fuel mileage tests.) The Yukon doesn’t offer an automatic engine start/stop system.

Tires and Wheels Comparison

The X5’s standard tires provide better handling because they have a lower 50 series profile (height to width ratio) that provides a stiffer sidewall than the Yukon SLE/SLT’s standard 65 series tires. The X5’s optional 275/35R22 front and 315/30R22 rear tires have a lower 35 series front and 30 series rear profile than the Yukon’s optional 45 series tires.

For better ride, handling and brake cooling the X5 has standard 19-inch wheels. Smaller 18-inch wheels are standard on the Yukon SLE/SLT.

Changing a flat tire near traffic can be dangerous and inconvenient. The run-flat tires available on the X5 can be driven up to 50 miles without any air pressure, allowing you to drive to a service station for a repair. The Yukon doesn’t offer run-flat tires.

Suspension and Handling Comparison

For superior ride and handling, the BMW X5 has fully independent front and rear suspensions. An independent suspension allows the wheels to follow the road at the best angle for gripping the pavement, without compromising ride comfort. The GMC Yukon has a solid rear axle, with a non-independent rear suspension.

The X5 has standard front and rear stabilizer bars, which help keep the X5 flat and controlled during cornering. The Yukon’s suspension doesn’t offer a rear stabilizer bar.

The X5 offers active sway bars, which help keep it flat and controlled during cornering, but disconnect at lower speeds to smooth the ride and offer greater off-road suspension articulation. This helps keep the tires glued to the road on-road and off. The Yukon doesn’t offer an active sway bar system.

The X5 offers an available adjustable active suspension system, which counteracts cornering forces actively, limiting body roll and improving handling and stability. GMC doesn’t offer an active suspension on the Yukon.

For a smoother ride and more stable handling, the X5’s wheelbase is 1.1 inches longer than on the Yukon (117.1 inches vs. 116 inches).

The X5’s front to rear weight distribution is more even (50.1% to 49.9%) than the Yukon’s (52% to 48%). This gives the X5 more stable handling and braking.

For greater off-road capability the X5 has a greater minimum ground clearance than the Yukon (8.7 vs. 8 inches), allowing the X5 to travel over rougher terrain without being stopped or damaged.

Chassis Comparison

The BMW X5 may be more efficient, handle and accelerate better because it weighs about 550 pounds less than the GMC Yukon.

The X5 is 9.6 inches shorter than the Yukon, making the X5 easier to handle, maneuver and park in tight spaces.

Unibody construction lowers the X5’s center of gravity significantly without reducing ground clearance. This contributes to better on the road handling and better off-road performance and stability. In addition, unibody construction makes the chassis stiffer, improving handling and reducing squeaks and rattles. The Yukon uses body-on-frame design instead.

Passenger Space Comparison

For enhanced passenger comfort on long trips the X5’s available third row seats recline. The Yukon’s third row seats don’t recline.

Ergonomics Comparison

The X5’s front and rear power windows all open or close with one touch of the switches, making it more convenient at drive-up windows and toll booths, or when talking with someone outside of the car. The Yukon’s rear power window switches have to be held the entire time to close them fully.

To help drivers see further while navigating curves, the X5 has standard adaptive headlights to illuminate around corners automatically by reading vehicle speed and steering wheel angle. The Yukon doesn’t offer cornering lights.

The X5’s optional Parking Assistant can parallel park or back into a parking spot by itself, with the driver only controlling speed with the brake pedal. The Yukon doesn’t offer an automated parking system.

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