Son's Automotive Group Compares 2014 Land Rover RANGE ROVER SPORT VS 2014 Cadillac SRX Near Tucker, GA

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2014 Land Rover RANGE ROVER SPORT

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VS

2014 Cadillac SRX

Safety Comparison

The Range Rover Sport’s front seatbelts will tighten automatically in the event the vehicle detects an impending crash, improving protection against injury significantly. The SRX doesn’t offer pre-crash pretensioners.

To provide maximum traction and stability on all roads, All-Wheel Drive is standard on the Range Rover Sport. But it costs extra on the SRX.

The Range Rover Sport offers an optional Surround Camera System to allow the driver to see objects all around the vehicle on a screen. The SRX only offers a rear monitor and front and rear parking sensors that beep or flash a light. That doesn’t help with obstacles to the sides.

Both the Range Rover Sport and the SRX have standard driver and passenger frontal airbags, front side-impact airbags, side-impact head airbags, height-adjustable front shoulder belts, traction control and electronic stability systems to prevent skidding.

Engine Comparison

The Range Rover Sport’s standard 3.0 supercharged V6 produces 32 more horsepower (340 vs. 308) and 67 lbs.-ft. more torque (332 vs. 265) than the SRX’s 3.6 DOHC V6. The Range Rover Sport Supercharged/Autobiography’s standard 5.0 supercharged V8 produces 202 more horsepower (510 vs. 308) and 196 lbs.-ft. more torque (461 vs. 265) than the SRX’s 3.6 DOHC V6.

As tested in Consumer Reports the Range Rover Sport 3.0 Supercharged is faster than the Cadillac SRX:

Range Rover Sport

SRX

Zero to 30 MPH

2.6 sec

2.7 sec

Zero to 60 MPH

6.5 sec

7.1 sec

45 to 65 MPH Passing

4.2 sec

5 sec

Quarter Mile

15.1 sec

15.7 sec

Speed in 1/4 Mile

94.8 MPH

90.6 MPH

Fuel Economy and Range Comparison

On the EPA test cycle the Range Rover Sport 3.0 Supercharged gets better fuel mileage than the SRX 4 (17 city/23 hwy vs. 16 city/23 hwy).

Regenerative brakes improve the Range Rover Sport’s fuel efficiency by converting inertia back into energy instead of wasting it. The SRX doesn’t offer a regenerative braking system.

In heavy traffic or at stoplights the Range Rover Sport’s engine automatically turns off when the vehicle is stopped, saving fuel and reducing pollution. The engine is automatically restarted when the driver gets ready to move again. (Start/Stop isn’t accounted in present EPA fuel mileage tests.) The SRX doesn’t offer an automatic engine start/stop system.

The Range Rover Sport has 6.7 gallons more fuel capacity than the SRX (27.7 vs. 21 gallons), for longer range between fill-ups.

Brakes and Stopping Comparison

For better stopping power the Range Rover Sport’s brake rotors are larger than those on the SRX:

Range Rover Sport 3.0

Range Rover Sport 5.0

SRX

Front Rotors

13.8 inches

15 inches

13.6 inches

Rear Rotors

13.8 inches

14.4 inches

12.4 inches

The Range Rover Sport stops much shorter than the SRX:

Range Rover Sport

SRX

70 to 0 MPH

167 feet

180 feet

Car and Driver

60 to 0 MPH

119 feet

128 feet

Motor Trend

60 to 0 MPH (Wet)

139 feet

147 feet

Consumer Reports

Tires and Wheels Comparison

For better traction, the Range Rover Sport has larger standard tires than the SRX (255/50R19 vs. 235/65R18). The Range Rover Sport’s optional tires are larger than the largest tires available on the SRX (275/40R22 vs. 235/65R18).

The Range Rover Sport’s standard tires provide better handling because they have a lower 50 series profile (height to width ratio) that provides a stiffer sidewall than the SRX’s standard 65 series tires. The Range Rover Sport’s optional tires have a lower 40 series profile than the SRX’s optional 55 series tires.

For better ride, handling and brake cooling the Range Rover Sport has standard 19-inch wheels. Smaller 18-inch wheels are standard on the SRX. The Range Rover Sport’s optional 22-inch wheels are larger than the 20-inch wheels optional on the SRX.

Suspension and Handling Comparison

The Range Rover Sport 5.0 Supercharged has active sway bars, which help keep it flat and controlled during cornering, but disconnect at lower speeds to smooth the ride and offer greater off-road suspension articulation. This helps keep the tires glued to the road on-road and off. The SRX doesn’t offer an active sway bar system.

The front and rear suspension of the Range Rover Sport uses air springs for a smoother, controlled ride than the SRX, which uses coil springs. Air springs maintain proper ride height and ride more smoothly.

The Range Rover Sport has a standard automatic front and rear load leveling suspension to keep ride height level with a heavy load or when towing. The Range Rover Sport’s height leveling suspension allows the driver to raise ride height for better off-road clearance and then lower it again for easier entering and exiting and better on-road handling. The SRX doesn’t offer a load leveling suspension.

For a smoother ride and more stable handling, the Range Rover Sport’s wheelbase is 4.6 inches longer than on the SRX (115.1 inches vs. 110.5 inches).

For better handling and stability, the track (width between the wheels) on the Range Rover Sport is 2.7 inches wider in the front and 2.9 inches wider in the rear than on the SRX.

The Range Rover Sport Supercharged handles at .86 G’s, while the SRX 4 pulls only .80 G’s of cornering force in a Car and Driver skidpad test.

The Range Rover Sport Supercharged executes Motor Trend’s “Figure Eight” maneuver 1.4 seconds quicker than the SRX 4 (25.8 seconds @ .71 average G’s vs. 27.2 seconds @ .63 average G’s).

For greater off-road capability the Range Rover Sport has a 4 inches greater minimum ground clearance than the SRX (11 vs. 7 inches), allowing the Range Rover Sport to travel over rougher terrain without being stopped or damaged.

Passenger Space Comparison

The Range Rover Sport offers optional seating for 7 passengers; the SRX can only carry 5.

Cargo Capacity Comparison

The Range Rover Sport has a larger cargo area with its rear seat folded than the SRX with its rear seat folded (62.2 vs. 61.1 cubic feet).

The Range Rover Sport’s cargo area is larger than the SRX’s in almost every dimension:

Range Rover Sport

SRX

Length to seat (2nd/1st)

41.5”/73.7”

38.3”/69.3”

Max Width

50.6”

53”

Min Width

44”

44.6”

Height

30.2”

29”

Ergonomics Comparison

Unlike the driver-only memory system optional at extra cost in the SRX, the Range Rover Sport has standard driver and passenger memory, so that when drivers switch, the memory setting adjusts the driver’s seat and the front passenger seat also adjusts to the new passenger’s preset preferences.

The Range Rover Sport’s standard easy entry system raises the steering wheel, making it easier for the driver to get in and out. An easy entry system costs extra on the SRX.

The Range Rover Sport’s front and rear power windows all open or close with one touch of the switches, making it more convenient at drive-up windows and toll booths, or when talking with someone outside of the car. The SRX’s rear power window switches have to be held the entire time to close them fully.

The Range Rover Sport’s rain-sensitive wipers adjust their speed and turn on and off automatically based on the amount of rainfall on the windshield. This allows the driver to concentrate on driving without constantly adjusting the wipers. The SRX’s standard manually variable intermittent wipers have to be constantly adjusted.

The Range Rover Sport’s optional Park Assist can parallel park or back into a parking spot by itself, with the driver only controlling speed with the brake pedal. The SRX doesn’t offer an automated parking system.

Recommendations Comparison

The Range Rover Sport was selected by Petersen's 4-Wheel & Off-Road magazine as their 2014 4x4 of the Year. The SRX has never been chosen.

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