Son's Automotive Group Compares 2014 Ford F-150 VS 2014 Nissan Titan Near Braselton, GA

Responsive image

2014 Ford F-150

Responsive image

2014 Ford F-150

VS
Responsive image

2014 Nissan Titan

Safety Comparison

When descending a steep, off-road slope, the F‑150 FX4/Raptor’s standard Hill Descent Control allows you to creep down safely. The Titan doesn’t offer Hill Descent Control.

The F‑150 offers optional SYNC ®, which uses a global positioning satellite (GPS) receiver and a cellular system to get turn-by-turn driving directions or send emergency personnel to the scene if any airbags deploy. The Titan doesn’t offer a GPS response system, only a navigation computer with no live response for emergencies, so if you’re involved in an accident and you’re incapacitated help may not come as quickly.

Both the F‑150 and the Titan have standard driver and passenger frontal airbags, front side-impact airbags, side-impact head airbags, front seatbelt pretensioners, height-adjustable front shoulder belts, plastic fuel tanks, traction control, electronic stability systems to prevent skidding and available four-wheel drive.

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration does 35 MPH front crash tests on new vehicles. In this test, results indicate that the Ford F‑150 6.5 ft. bed SuperCab is safer than the Titan King Cab:

F‑150

Titan

Driver

STARS

5 Stars

5 Stars

Chest forces

36 g’s

41 g’s

Leg injuries (L/R)

87 / 150

705 / 776

Passenger

STARS

5 Stars

4 Stars

Head Injury Index

433

721

Chest forces

34 g’s

41 g’s

Leg injuries (L/R)

540 / 262

829 / 498

More stars indicate a better overall result. Lower numbers indicate better individual test results. Not comparable with post-2010 results.

In a 31 MPH side-impact test, the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety crashes a 3300 pound sled into the side of new vehicles. In this test, results indicate that the Ford F‑150 SuperCrew is safer than the Titan Crew Cab:

F‑150

Titan

Overall Evaluation

GOOD

MARGINAL

Structure

GOOD

ACCEPTABLE

Driver

Head Protection Rating

GOOD

GOOD

Head Injury Rating

GOOD

GOOD

Torso Injury Rating

GOOD

POOR

Pelvis/Leg Injury Rating

GOOD

MARGINAL

Head Injury Criterion

263

323

Shoulder Movement

43 mm

47 mm

Rear Passenger

Head Protection Rating

GOOD

MARGINAL

Head Injury Rating

GOOD

GOOD

Torso Injury Rating

GOOD

GOOD

Pelvis/Leg Injury Rating

GOOD

GOOD

Head Injury Criterion

57

69

Shoulder Movement

14 mm

25 mm

The Insurance Institute for Highway Safety ( IIHS) performs roof strength tests. In that test the F‑150 earned the top rating of “Good” because its roof supported over four times the F‑150’s weight before being crushed five inches. The Titan was rated lower at “Acceptable.”

The Insurance Institute for Highway Safety rates the general design of front seat head restraints for their ability to protect front seat occupants from whiplash injuries. The IIHS also performs a dynamic test on those seats with “good” or “acceptable” geometry. In these ratings, the F‑150 with power recline seats is safer then the Titan:

F‑150

Titan

Overall Evaluation

GOOD

ACCEPTABLE

Head Restraint Design

GOOD

GOOD

Distance from Back of Head

20 mm

89 mm

Distance Below Top of Head

8 mm

33 mm

Dynamic Test Rating

GOOD

GOOD

Seat Design

Pass

Pass

Neck Force Rating

Low

Low

Max Neck Shearing Force

26

36

(Lower numerical results are better in all tests.)

The Ford F‑150 has a better fatality history. The F‑150 was involved in fatal accidents at a rate 59.4% lower per vehicle registered than the Titan, according to the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety.

Warranty Comparison

There are almost 4 times as many Ford dealers as there are Nissan dealers, which makes it much easier should you ever need service under the F‑150’s warranty.

Reliability Comparison

To reliably power the ignition and other systems and to recharge the battery, the F‑150 has a standard 135-amp alternator (155-amp - F‑150 optional). The Titan’s 130-amp alternator isn’t as powerful.

To reliably start during all conditions and help handle large electrical loads, the F‑150 has a standard 750-amp battery. The Titan’s standard 650-amp battery and largest (optional) 710 amp battery aren’t as powerful.

A reliable vehicle saves its owner time, money and trouble. Nobody wants to be stranded or have to be without their vehicle while it’s being repaired. Consumer Reports predicts that the Ford F‑150 ECOBoost’s reliability will be 54% better than the Titan and the Ford F‑150 V6 will be 112% better than the Titan.

J.D. Power and Associates’ 2013 Initial Quality Study of new car owners surveyed provide the statistics that show that Ford vehicles are better in initial quality than Nissan vehicles. J.D. Power ranks Ford 27th in initial quality. With 11 more problems per 100 vehicles, Nissan is ranked 30th.

J.D. Power and Associates’ 2013 survey of the owners of three-year-old vehicles provides the long-term dependability statistics that show that Ford vehicles are more reliable than Nissan vehicles. J.D. Power ranks Ford 13th in reliability. With 10 more problems per 100 vehicles, Nissan is ranked 19th.

Engine Comparison

The F‑150’s optional 5.0 DOHC V8 produces 43 more horsepower (360 vs. 317) than the Titan’s 5.6 DOHC V8. The F‑150’s optional 3.5 turbo V6 produces 48 more horsepower (365 vs. 317) and 35 lbs.-ft. more torque (420 vs. 385) than the Titan’s 5.6 DOHC V8. The F‑150’s optional 6.2 SOHC V8 produces 94 more horsepower (411 vs. 317) and 49 lbs.-ft. more torque (434 vs. 385) than the Titan’s 5.6 DOHC V8.

As tested in Car and Driver the Ford F‑150 3.5 ECOBoost V6 is faster than the Nissan Titan:

F‑150

Titan

Zero to 30 MPH

2.1 sec

2.6 sec

Zero to 60 MPH

6.2 sec

7.6 sec

Zero to 100 MPH

17.2 sec

23.5 sec

5 to 60 MPH Rolling Start

7.1 sec

7.7 sec

Passing 30 to 50 MPH

3.7 sec

3.8 sec

Passing 50 to 70 MPH

4.9 sec

5.5 sec

Quarter Mile

14.8 sec

16 sec

Speed in 1/4 Mile

94 MPH

86 MPH

Fuel Economy and Range Comparison

On the EPA test cycle the F‑150 gets better fuel mileage than the Titan:

F‑150

Titan

4x2

3.7 V6/Auto

17 city/23 hwy

n/a

Turbo V6/Auto

16 city/22 hwy

n/a

5.0 V8/Auto

15 city/21 hwy

13 city/18 hwy

5.6 V8

4x4

3.7 V6/Auto

16 city/21 hwy

n/a

Turbo V6/Auto

15 city/21 hwy

n/a

5.0 V8/Auto

14 city/19 hwy

12 city/17 hwy

5.6 V8

The F‑150’s optional fuel tank has 8 gallons more fuel capacity than the Titan (36 vs. 28 gallons).

The F‑150 has a standard cap-less fueling system. The fuel filler is automatically opened when the fuel nozzle is inserted and automatically closed when it’s removed. This eliminates the need to unscrew and replace the cap and it reduces fuel evaporation, which causes pollution. The Titan doesn’t offer a cap-less fueling system.

Brakes and Stopping Comparison

The F‑150’s standard front and rear disc brakes are vented to help dissipate heat for shorter stops with less fading. The rear discs on the Titan are solid, not vented.

Tires and Wheels Comparison

For better traction, the F‑150 Raptor’s tires are larger than the largest tires available on the Titan (315/70R17 vs. 275/70R18).

The F‑150 5.5 ft. bed Limited SuperCrew’s tires provide better handling because they have a lower 45 series profile (height to width ratio) that provides a stiffer sidewall than the Titan Short Bed SL Crew Cab’s 60 series tires.

For better load carrying, ride, handling and brake cooling the F‑150 5.5 ft. bed Limited SuperCrew has standard 22-inch wheels. The Titan’s largest wheels are only 20-inches.

The Ford F‑150’s wheels have 7 lugs for longer wheel bearing life, less chance of rotor warping and greater strength. The Nissan Titan only has 6 wheel lugs per wheel.

Suspension and Handling Comparison

The F‑150 has standard front and rear gas-charged shocks for better control over choppy roads. The Titan base model’s suspension doesn’t offer gas-charged shocks.

For a smoother ride and more stable handling, the F‑150’s wheelbase is longer than on the Titan:

F‑150

Titan

Regular Cab Standard Bed

125.9 inches

n/a

Extended Cab Short Bed

133.3 inches

n/a

Extended Cab Standard Bed

144.5 inches

139.8 inches

Extended Cab Long Bed

163.1 inches

n/a

Crew Cab Short Bed

144.5 inches

139.8 inches

For better handling and stability, the average track (width between the wheels) on the F‑150 is 2.3 inches wider in the front and 2.3 inches wider in the rear than the average track on the Titan.

The F‑150 5.5 ft. bed King Ranch SuperCrew 4x4 handles at .73 G’s, while the Titan Short Bed SV Crew Cab 4x4 pulls only .71 G’s of cornering force in a Car and Driver skidpad test.

Chassis Comparison

The F‑150 6.5 ft. bed Regular Cab is 11.4 inches shorter than the Titan Standard Bed King Cab, making the F‑150 easier to handle, maneuver and park in tight spaces.

As tested by Car and Driver while under full throttle, the interior of the F‑150 5.5 ft. bed Lariat SuperCrew 4x4 is quieter than the Titan Short Bed SV Crew Cab 4x4 (73 vs. 75 dB).

Passenger Space Comparison

The F‑150 SuperCab has .8 inches more front shoulder room, .7 inches more rear headroom, .3 inches more rear legroom, 5.1 inches more rear hip room and .8 inches more rear shoulder room than the Titan King Cab.

The F‑150 SuperCrew has .8 inches more front shoulder room, 3.1 inches more rear legroom, 4.1 inches more rear hip room and .9 inches more rear shoulder room than the Titan Crew Cab.

Cargo Capacity Comparison

The F‑150 5.5 ft. bed has a much larger cargo box than the Titan Crew Cab Short Bed (55.4 vs. 48.6 cubic feet). The F‑150 6.5 ft. Bed has a much larger cargo box than the Titan Crew Cab Long Bed (65.5 vs. 63.1 cubic feet). The F‑150 Cab 8.0 ft. bed has a much larger cargo box than the Titan  King Cab (81.3 vs. 57.3 cubic feet).

A low lift-over bed design makes loading and unloading the F‑150 Regular Cab easier. The F‑150 Regular Cab’s bed lift-over height is 34.1 inches, while the Titan’s liftover is 37 inches. The F‑150 SuperCrew’s liftover is only 33.1 inches.

The F‑150’s cargo box is larger than the Titan’s in almost every dimension:

F‑150 SuperCrew

F‑150 Regular Cab

Titan King Cab

Length (short/long)

67”/78.8”

78.8”/97.4”

79.1”

Max Width

64.3”

64.3”

63.8”

Min Width

50”

50”

50”

Height

22.4”

22.4”

19.9”

The Ford F‑150 has a standard tailgate assist feature, which prevents the heavy tailgate from falling with a crash and causing injury. It allows adults and children to easily open and close the tailgate with one hand to better facilitate loading and unloading. Tailgate assist isn’t available on the Titan S.

The Ford F‑150 offers an optional tailgate step, which folds out and allows for much easier access to the cargo area. The Nissan Titan doesn’t offer a rear cargo step.

Ergonomics Comparison

The F‑150 offers a remote vehicle starting system, so the vehicle can be started from inside the driver's house. This allows the driver to comfortably warm up the engine before going out to the vehicle. The climate system will also automatically heat or cool the interior. The Titan doesn’t offer a remote starting system.

The engine computer on the F‑150 automatically engages the starter until the car starts with one twist of the key and disables the starter while the engine is running. The Titan’s starter can be accidentally engaged while the engine is running, making a grinding noise and possibly damaging the starter and ring gear.

The power windows available on both the F‑150 and the Titan have locks to prevent small children from operating them. When the lock on the F‑150 is engaged the driver can still operate all of the windows, for instance to close one opened by a child. The Titan prevents the driver from operating the other windows just as it does the other passengers.

In case you lock your keys in your vehicle, or don’t have them with you, you can let yourself in using the F‑150’s standard exterior keypad (not available on F‑150 XL/STX). The Titan doesn’t offer an exterior keypad entry system.

The F‑150 Platinum/Limited’s standard wipers adjust their speed and turn on and off automatically according to the amount of rainfall on the windshield. The Titan’s intermittent wipers change speed with vehicle speed, but can’t turn on and off or change speed based on changing rainfall.

Both the F‑150 and the Titan offer available heated front seats. The F‑150 King Ranch/Platinum/Limited also has standard heated rear seats to keep those passengers extremely comfortable in the winter. Heated rear seats aren’t available in the Titan.

The F‑150 (except XL/SXT/XLT)’s optional air conditioned front seats cool the driver and front passenger and help take the sting out of hot leather in Summer. The Titan doesn’t offer air conditioned front seats.

Both the F‑150 and the Titan offer rear vents. For greater rear passenger comfort, the F‑150 Crew Cab offers optional rear air conditioning vents to keep rear occupants cool in summer or warm in winter. The Titan Crew Cab doesn’t offer rear air conditioning vents, only heat vents.

Economic Advantages Comparison

Insurance will cost less for the F‑150 owner. The Complete Car Cost Guide estimates that insurance for the F‑150 will cost $1145 less than the Titan over a five-year period.

According to The Car Book by Jack Gillis, the F‑150 is less expensive to operate than the Titan because it costs $294 less to do the manufacturer’s suggested maintenance for 50,000 miles. Typical repairs cost much less on the F‑150 than the Titan, including $131 less for an alternator, $15 less for front brake pads, $114 less for a starter, $124 less for fuel injection, $70 less for a fuel pump, $99 less for front struts, $284 less for a timing belt/chain and $250 less for a power steering pump.

Recommendations Comparison

J.D. Power and Associates rated the F‑150 first among large pickups in owner reported satisfaction in 2014. This includes how well the vehicle performs and satisfies its owner’s expectations. The Titan isn’t in the top three.

Motor Trend selected the F‑150 as their 2012 Truck of the Year. The Titan has never been chosen.

The Ford F-Series outsold the Nissan Titan by almost 49 to one during 2013.

© 1991-2016 Advanta-STAR Automotive Research. All rights reserved. Who We Are
Click here to view the disclaimers, limitations and notices about EPA fuel mileage, crash tests, coprights, trademarks, and other issues.